But first, coffee! A photo essay.

But first, coffee! A photo essay.

By Bianca Mogos

 

 

Slow Start at the camping site

We started the day very late and slowly. Since we didn’t have to work on this morning, we indulged ourselves with a bit more rest. Had breakfast (but not coffee!!) in front of our cabins, in the warm sunlight of the morning.

However, before we started the tour, we stopped for a much-needed cup of coffee. Our day was off to a great start!

 

Shortly about the Afsluitdijk:

  • it was built between 1927 and 1932;
  • it measures 32 kilometres;
  • it connects directly the provinces of Fryslan and Noord-Holland;
  • it is a primary water barrier in The Netherlands;
  • it does not meet the safety standards anymore;
  • the enforcement constructions started this year and they will be continuing until 2022;
  • after that:
  • it will be able to withstand a superstorm (1 in 10,000 years);
  • fish migration will be possible;
  • renewable energy will be generated by a hydroelectric plant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Besides being very informative, the tour was also interactive: We could colour our own fish and see them happily swimming with the other fish.

After a quick picture on the IJsselmeer side of the dike, we headed back to Hindeloopen.

At lunch we enjoyed the traditional Dutch kibbeling (deep-fried pieces of white fish, topped with special spices) and deep-fried mussels, all with fries and sauce on the side.

Much to everyone’s excitement, Peter showed us the traditional way of eating herring.

The tiny village turned out to be very picturesque. We stopped to admire the bridges, the canals, the cosy houses and boutiques. We continued with a walk on the dike and stopped by the chocolate factory.

 

International Dinner

When we arrived back at the campus, some of us started working again on our cases (since we’ve been slacking off a bit), while some of us started preparing dinner.

If last night we had traditional Dutch, Romanian and Burmese food, tonight we will be enjoying some traditional Omani, Israeli and South-African dishes.

 

Peter de Jong